"What does it mean to be willing to die for a cause in a society that already considers you to be hyper-disposable? Your evisceration, your death is desirable and actively pursued. What if the revolutionary act in such a society, in such a world, is to live out loud instead? Or simply to live."

The Michigan Defeat; the Michigan Victory - Keeping the Issue of Palestine Alive on Campus

By David Palumbo-Liu, Truthout

It is heartening to see that many people are passionately involved, and that the legacy of activism is strong in those, young and old, who have not given in to complacency. In fact, as their administrators criticized the boycott (unsurprisingly, none mentioned that the boycott was an entirely legal exercise in academic freedom), students began writing letters to their administrators defending those who supported the boycott and in effect educating their administrators on the actual content of the resolution and the issues involved…

There has been a marked change in the debate over Israel-Palestine. Little by little, in various parts of the campus, one finds small but significant openings in the discussion.

6bds, divestment, palestine, Israel,

"Do What You Gotta Do": Cop Shows Bolster Idea That Police Violence Works f

By Aaron Cantu, Truthout | News Analysis

6police, chicago pd, police violence,

 Living in Doubt: West Virginians Seek Safe Water After Elk River Chemical Spill 

More than two months after Freedom Industries spilled 10,000 gallons of toxic 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and an unknown amount of a polyglycol ether into the Elk River in West Virginia, many residents rely on volunteer efforts for safe drinking water.
On January 9, 2014, nearly 300,000 residents from nine counties in the vicinity of Charleston were left without drinking water after the spill occurred just upstream from the main West Virginia American Water municipal intake and treatment center. Two months later, residents and some businesses continue to use bottled water for drinking and cooking because they do not trust that tap water is safe.
In light of what many see as an inadequate response from the state in getting residents clean, safe water, the WV Clean Water Hub was established. They have so far been able to do what the state has failed to - make home deliveries of free water to elderly, disabled and other residents who cannot get out to pick it up themselves.

 By James Fassinger, Truthout | Photo Essay
ZoomInfo
 Living in Doubt: West Virginians Seek Safe Water After Elk River Chemical Spill 

More than two months after Freedom Industries spilled 10,000 gallons of toxic 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and an unknown amount of a polyglycol ether into the Elk River in West Virginia, many residents rely on volunteer efforts for safe drinking water.
On January 9, 2014, nearly 300,000 residents from nine counties in the vicinity of Charleston were left without drinking water after the spill occurred just upstream from the main West Virginia American Water municipal intake and treatment center. Two months later, residents and some businesses continue to use bottled water for drinking and cooking because they do not trust that tap water is safe.
In light of what many see as an inadequate response from the state in getting residents clean, safe water, the WV Clean Water Hub was established. They have so far been able to do what the state has failed to - make home deliveries of free water to elderly, disabled and other residents who cannot get out to pick it up themselves.

 By James Fassinger, Truthout | Photo Essay
ZoomInfo
 Living in Doubt: West Virginians Seek Safe Water After Elk River Chemical Spill 

More than two months after Freedom Industries spilled 10,000 gallons of toxic 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and an unknown amount of a polyglycol ether into the Elk River in West Virginia, many residents rely on volunteer efforts for safe drinking water.
On January 9, 2014, nearly 300,000 residents from nine counties in the vicinity of Charleston were left without drinking water after the spill occurred just upstream from the main West Virginia American Water municipal intake and treatment center. Two months later, residents and some businesses continue to use bottled water for drinking and cooking because they do not trust that tap water is safe.
In light of what many see as an inadequate response from the state in getting residents clean, safe water, the WV Clean Water Hub was established. They have so far been able to do what the state has failed to - make home deliveries of free water to elderly, disabled and other residents who cannot get out to pick it up themselves.

 By James Fassinger, Truthout | Photo Essay
ZoomInfo
 Living in Doubt: West Virginians Seek Safe Water After Elk River Chemical Spill 

More than two months after Freedom Industries spilled 10,000 gallons of toxic 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and an unknown amount of a polyglycol ether into the Elk River in West Virginia, many residents rely on volunteer efforts for safe drinking water.
On January 9, 2014, nearly 300,000 residents from nine counties in the vicinity of Charleston were left without drinking water after the spill occurred just upstream from the main West Virginia American Water municipal intake and treatment center. Two months later, residents and some businesses continue to use bottled water for drinking and cooking because they do not trust that tap water is safe.
In light of what many see as an inadequate response from the state in getting residents clean, safe water, the WV Clean Water Hub was established. They have so far been able to do what the state has failed to - make home deliveries of free water to elderly, disabled and other residents who cannot get out to pick it up themselves.

 By James Fassinger, Truthout | Photo Essay
ZoomInfo

Living in Doubt: West Virginians Seek Safe Water After Elk River Chemical Spill

More than two months after Freedom Industries spilled 10,000 gallons of toxic 4-methylcyclohexane methanol and an unknown amount of a polyglycol ether into the Elk River in West Virginia, many residents rely on volunteer efforts for safe drinking water.

On January 9, 2014, nearly 300,000 residents from nine counties in the vicinity of Charleston were left without drinking water after the spill occurred just upstream from the main West Virginia American Water municipal intake and treatment center. Two months later, residents and some businesses continue to use bottled water for drinking and cooking because they do not trust that tap water is safe.

In light of what many see as an inadequate response from the state in getting residents clean, safe water, the WV Clean Water Hub was established. They have so far been able to do what the state has failed to - make home deliveries of free water to elderly, disabled and other residents who cannot get out to pick it up themselves.

By James Fassinger, Truthout | Photo Essay

6west virginia, west virginia chemical spill, drinking water,

Sex Work Wars: Project ROSE, Monica Jones and the Fight for Human Rights f

By Mike Ludwig, Truthout | Report

6Sex workers, sex work, monica jones, project rose,

Denton, Texas Citizens Group Fights for Fracking Ban

Maile Bush’s three-bedroom home is sandwiched between two EagleRidge Energy fracking sites in Denton, Texas. Towering temporary walls block her view of the frack sites, but nothing can stop the noise, lights and fumes from infiltrating her property.
Bush’s formerly safe, quiet suburban neighborhood is now a dangerous industrial zone. Last October, when she learned about EagleRidge’s plans to frack under the D.H. Horton subdivision her house is part of, ‘Meadows at Hickory Creek,’ Bush started asking questions.
In January 2013, the Denton City Council passed an ordinance requiring a 1200 foot setback for drilling next to homes, schools and hospitals. But the regulation has a loophole exempting sites that were drilled before the ordinance was passed. As a result, it was possible for sites to be drilled as close as 200 feet to some residences.

By Julie Dermansky | Report
ZoomInfo
Denton, Texas Citizens Group Fights for Fracking Ban

Maile Bush’s three-bedroom home is sandwiched between two EagleRidge Energy fracking sites in Denton, Texas. Towering temporary walls block her view of the frack sites, but nothing can stop the noise, lights and fumes from infiltrating her property.
Bush’s formerly safe, quiet suburban neighborhood is now a dangerous industrial zone. Last October, when she learned about EagleRidge’s plans to frack under the D.H. Horton subdivision her house is part of, ‘Meadows at Hickory Creek,’ Bush started asking questions.
In January 2013, the Denton City Council passed an ordinance requiring a 1200 foot setback for drilling next to homes, schools and hospitals. But the regulation has a loophole exempting sites that were drilled before the ordinance was passed. As a result, it was possible for sites to be drilled as close as 200 feet to some residences.

By Julie Dermansky | Report
ZoomInfo
Denton, Texas Citizens Group Fights for Fracking Ban

Maile Bush’s three-bedroom home is sandwiched between two EagleRidge Energy fracking sites in Denton, Texas. Towering temporary walls block her view of the frack sites, but nothing can stop the noise, lights and fumes from infiltrating her property.
Bush’s formerly safe, quiet suburban neighborhood is now a dangerous industrial zone. Last October, when she learned about EagleRidge’s plans to frack under the D.H. Horton subdivision her house is part of, ‘Meadows at Hickory Creek,’ Bush started asking questions.
In January 2013, the Denton City Council passed an ordinance requiring a 1200 foot setback for drilling next to homes, schools and hospitals. But the regulation has a loophole exempting sites that were drilled before the ordinance was passed. As a result, it was possible for sites to be drilled as close as 200 feet to some residences.

By Julie Dermansky | Report
ZoomInfo
Denton, Texas Citizens Group Fights for Fracking Ban

Maile Bush’s three-bedroom home is sandwiched between two EagleRidge Energy fracking sites in Denton, Texas. Towering temporary walls block her view of the frack sites, but nothing can stop the noise, lights and fumes from infiltrating her property.
Bush’s formerly safe, quiet suburban neighborhood is now a dangerous industrial zone. Last October, when she learned about EagleRidge’s plans to frack under the D.H. Horton subdivision her house is part of, ‘Meadows at Hickory Creek,’ Bush started asking questions.
In January 2013, the Denton City Council passed an ordinance requiring a 1200 foot setback for drilling next to homes, schools and hospitals. But the regulation has a loophole exempting sites that were drilled before the ordinance was passed. As a result, it was possible for sites to be drilled as close as 200 feet to some residences.

By Julie Dermansky | Report
ZoomInfo

Denton, Texas Citizens Group Fights for Fracking Ban

Maile Bush’s three-bedroom home is sandwiched between two EagleRidge Energy fracking sites in Denton, Texas. Towering temporary walls block her view of the frack sites, but nothing can stop the noise, lights and fumes from infiltrating her property.

Bush’s formerly safe, quiet suburban neighborhood is now a dangerous industrial zone. Last October, when she learned about EagleRidge’s plans to frack under the D.H. Horton subdivision her house is part of, ‘Meadows at Hickory Creek,’ Bush started asking questions.

In January 2013, the Denton City Council passed an ordinance requiring a 1200 foot setback for drilling next to homes, schools and hospitals. But the regulation has a loophole exempting sites that were drilled before the ordinance was passed. As a result, it was possible for sites to be drilled as close as 200 feet to some residences.

By Julie Dermansky | Report

6Fracking, Texas, Denton, environmental justice,

"Every Saturday morning, I volunteer as a clinic escort at an abortion clinic in New Jersey. I’ve been called every name I can possibly think of: murderer, baby killer, “deathscort,” even a “stuck-up bitch.” I’ve been told I’m going to Hell, that I have a wicked heart, that I am an evil woman. I have even been sexually harassed by a male protester. But no matter what, I do not respond. None of us respond. We don’t even make eye contact with the protesters. We have learned to tune it out, more or less. But when these horrific insults are hurled at patients, I won’t lie: It sometimes becomes difficult to bear."

(Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout)

The March of Anthropogenic Climate Disruption

By Dahr Jamail, Truthout | News Analysis

Last year marked the 37th consecutive year of above-average global temperature, according to data from NASA.

The signs of advanced Anthropogenic Climate Disruption (ACD) are all around us, becoming ever more visible by the day.

At least for those choosing to pay attention.

6climate change, climate, climate science, california drought,

(Image: Jared Rodriguez / Truthout)

Mad DNA

By Eisa Nefertari Ulen, Truthout | Op-Ed

I once was a black girl. Culturally, spiritually, politically, most definitely economically, I was African in America, a sistah, and a sister, too. As black as fried chicken and watermelon - and Jack and Jill. As black as a soul clap in a dark nightclub - and a Sunday morning praise song. As black as SNCC, the Panthers, campus BSUs, and PE - as black as SCLC, CORE and the NAACP. I mean Obama black. I was black as food stamps - and a Black Man’s Whip. (Ya’ll know that’s a BMW, right?)

When anyone asked, “What are you?” I didn’t mind. I laughed and told them, “I am a black girl.” When they persisted and asked, “No, where are you from?” I’d laugh again and say, “The East Coast, baby!” If they gave me a look, I’d smile and tell them this:

"I’m part Bermudian, Bajan, Jamaican, English, French, German, Scotch-Irish, Native American and, obviously I’m African. But of course we don’t know from where. Some people have mad loot. I have mad DNA." Depending on the asker, I would add, "But really I’m just a light-skinned black girl."

And I was. Really, I was. As black as can be, and free to be me. I once was a real black girl. Until a few months ago…

Read More

6identity, dna, family history, indigenous,

Dahr Jamail | Toxic Legacy: Uranium Mining in New Mexico f

Read more from Dahr Jamail’s first story as a full-time staff reporter for Truthout!

6uranium, radiation, new mexico, navajo, indigenous,

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